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Sensory Integration Therapy

“Sensory Integration is the organisation of sensations for use. Our senses give us information about the physical conditions of our body and the environment around us.”
Jean Ayres

Sensory Processing Difficulties can present in a range of different ways. Children might struggle to participate in daily activities such as dressing, wearing clothes of different textures, washing their hair, eating a range of different foods, coping with certain noises or in busy or loud settings. They may present as having poor attention, clumsy, hyperactive, perhaps developmentally delayed behind other children of their own age. They may have difficulties playing, problem solving, or developing skills.

Information from our sensory systems is essential for us to be able to engage in the world around us. Each of these systems individually fulfil a specific role for us, and together they constantly inform our brain about our body and our environment. This is so we can attend to what is important for us – keeping us safe, or interacting, exploring, mastering. Our sensory processing is very closely linked with our emotional processing and regulation.

We may be over-responsive to particular sensory input. This means that our brain needs to receive less information from one or more of our sensory systems to register and process it. This often means we are sensitive to that kind of sensory information. For example, if we are over-responsive to auditory input, noisy environments, or particularly loud noises such as hand dryers may bother us.

Alternatively, we may be under-responsive to particular sensory input. This means that our brain needs to receive more information from one or more of our sensory systems to register and process it. For example, if we are under-responsive to tactile input, we may not notice food on our face after eating.

This can be affected by our neurological thresholds, or by past experience (or lack thereof). We may also demonstrate seeking (or “craving”) of particular sensory input, for example seeking movement.

Please see here for further information on our individual sensory systems.

We have a range of assessment and profiling methods to support us to understand each of our clients holistically; from a sensory, emotional, neurodevelopmental, and physical perspective. Our Therapists are both Advanced Sensory Integration Practitioners and Sensory Integration and Praxis Test [SIPT] certified. Further information relating to the specialisms of our team can be found on Our Team page.

“Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) is described as a neurological impairment which impedes on an individual’s ability to engage in their environment, affecting our ability to engage in everyday life. It is considered to include a ‘cluster’ of disorders which relate to how the Central Nervous System processes and interprets information from the sensory systems.”
Joanna Cosbey